Cellular and molecular neurophysiology [electronic resource] / Constance Hammond.

By: Hammond, C. (Constance) [author.]
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Amsterdam : Elsevier/AP, [2015]Edition: 4th editionDescription: 1 online resource (ix, 433 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780123973221; 0123973228Uniform titles: Cellular and molecular neurobiology Subject(s): Molecular neurobiology | Neurons | Nervous System Physiological Phenomena | Nervous System -- cytology | SOCIAL SCIENCE / Anthropology / Physical | Molecular neurobiology | Neurons | Nervous System Physiological PhenomenaGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Cellular and molecular neurophysiology.DDC classification: 573.848 LOC classification: QP356.2 | .H36 2015ebOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgments; Part I -- Neurons: Excitable Andsecretory Cells Thatestablish Synapses; Chapter 1 -- Neurons; 1.1 -- Neurons have a cell body from which emerge two types of processes: the dendrites and the axon; 1.1.1 -- The somatodendritic tree is the neuron's receptive pole; 1.1.2 -- The axon and its collaterals are the neuron's transmitter pole; 1.2 -- Neurons are highly polarized cells with a differential distribution of organelles and proteins; 1.2.1 -- The soma is the main site of macromolecule synthesis.
1.2.2 -- The dendrites contain free ribosomes and synthesize some of their proteinsmRNA trafficking and local protein synthesis in dendrites; 1.2.3 -- The axon, to a large extent, lacks the machinery for protein synthesis; 1.3 -- Axonal transport allows bidirectional communication between the cell body and the axon terminals; 1.3.1 -- Demonstration of axonal transport; 1.3.2 -- Fast anterograde axonal transport is responsible for the movement of membranous organelles from cell body towards a ... ; The pioneer living preparation; Identification of the moving organelles and their substrates.
The role of ATP and kinesinPlus-end vesicle motors; 1.3.3 -- Retrograde axonal transport returns old membrane constituents, trophic factors, exogenous material to the cell body; The minus-end motor(s); Functions of retrograde transport; 1.3.4 -- Slow anterograde axonal transport moves cytoskeletal proteins and cytosoluble proteins; The different cytoskeletal elements are assembled and connected by bridges in the cell body; The cytoskeletal proteins are transported in a soluble form or as isolated fibrils and assembled during their progression.
The transport of microtubules and neurofilaments is bidirectional, intermittent, asynchronous, and occurs at the fast rate ... 1.3.5 -- Axonal transport of mitochondria allows the turnover of mitochondria in axons and axon terminals; 1.4 -- Neurons connected by synapses form networks or circuits; 1.4.1 -- The circuit of the withdrawal medullary reflex; 1.4.2 -- The spinothalamic tract or anterolateral pathway is a somatosensory pathway; 1.4.3 -- How are the different noxious stimuli analyzed? Functional dissection of pain circuits with targeted ablative or op ...
1.5 -- Summary: the neuron is an excitable and secretory cell presenting an extreme functional regionalizationRegionalization of metabolic functions; Regionalization of functions implicated in reception and transmission of electrical signals; Regionalization of secretory function; Further reading; Chapter 2 -- Neuron-glial cell cooperation; 2.1 -- Astrocytes form a vast cellular network or syncytium between neurons, blood vessels and the surface of the brain; 2.1.1 -- Astrocytes are star-shaped cells characterized by the presence of glial filaments in their cytoplasm.
2.1.2 -- Astrocytes form an active bridge between neurons and the blood-brain barrier.
Summary: This new, thoroughly revised fourth edition is the only current, established and authoritative text focusing on the cellular and molecular physiology of nerve cells. Understanding the functioning of the neuron, the basic cell of the central nervous system requires a clear understanding of the cellular and molecular physiology of the neuron. The book is hypothesis driven rather than just presenting the facts, and the content is firmly based on numerous experiments performed by the top experts in the field. While the book does cover the important facts, it also presents the background for how researchers arrived at this knowledge to provide a context for the field. It teaches not only how excitable cells work in detail, but also how to construct and conduct intelligent research experiments. This book promotes a real understanding of the function of nerve cells that is useful for practicing neurophysiologists and students in a graduate-level course on the topic alike.
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Previous edition: 2008.

This new, thoroughly revised fourth edition is the only current, established and authoritative text focusing on the cellular and molecular physiology of nerve cells. Understanding the functioning of the neuron, the basic cell of the central nervous system requires a clear understanding of the cellular and molecular physiology of the neuron. The book is hypothesis driven rather than just presenting the facts, and the content is firmly based on numerous experiments performed by the top experts in the field. While the book does cover the important facts, it also presents the background for how researchers arrived at this knowledge to provide a context for the field. It teaches not only how excitable cells work in detail, but also how to construct and conduct intelligent research experiments. This book promotes a real understanding of the function of nerve cells that is useful for practicing neurophysiologists and students in a graduate-level course on the topic alike.

Print version record.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgments; Part I -- Neurons: Excitable Andsecretory Cells Thatestablish Synapses; Chapter 1 -- Neurons; 1.1 -- Neurons have a cell body from which emerge two types of processes: the dendrites and the axon; 1.1.1 -- The somatodendritic tree is the neuron's receptive pole; 1.1.2 -- The axon and its collaterals are the neuron's transmitter pole; 1.2 -- Neurons are highly polarized cells with a differential distribution of organelles and proteins; 1.2.1 -- The soma is the main site of macromolecule synthesis.

1.2.2 -- The dendrites contain free ribosomes and synthesize some of their proteinsmRNA trafficking and local protein synthesis in dendrites; 1.2.3 -- The axon, to a large extent, lacks the machinery for protein synthesis; 1.3 -- Axonal transport allows bidirectional communication between the cell body and the axon terminals; 1.3.1 -- Demonstration of axonal transport; 1.3.2 -- Fast anterograde axonal transport is responsible for the movement of membranous organelles from cell body towards a ... ; The pioneer living preparation; Identification of the moving organelles and their substrates.

The role of ATP and kinesinPlus-end vesicle motors; 1.3.3 -- Retrograde axonal transport returns old membrane constituents, trophic factors, exogenous material to the cell body; The minus-end motor(s); Functions of retrograde transport; 1.3.4 -- Slow anterograde axonal transport moves cytoskeletal proteins and cytosoluble proteins; The different cytoskeletal elements are assembled and connected by bridges in the cell body; The cytoskeletal proteins are transported in a soluble form or as isolated fibrils and assembled during their progression.

The transport of microtubules and neurofilaments is bidirectional, intermittent, asynchronous, and occurs at the fast rate ... 1.3.5 -- Axonal transport of mitochondria allows the turnover of mitochondria in axons and axon terminals; 1.4 -- Neurons connected by synapses form networks or circuits; 1.4.1 -- The circuit of the withdrawal medullary reflex; 1.4.2 -- The spinothalamic tract or anterolateral pathway is a somatosensory pathway; 1.4.3 -- How are the different noxious stimuli analyzed? Functional dissection of pain circuits with targeted ablative or op ...

1.5 -- Summary: the neuron is an excitable and secretory cell presenting an extreme functional regionalizationRegionalization of metabolic functions; Regionalization of functions implicated in reception and transmission of electrical signals; Regionalization of secretory function; Further reading; Chapter 2 -- Neuron-glial cell cooperation; 2.1 -- Astrocytes form a vast cellular network or syncytium between neurons, blood vessels and the surface of the brain; 2.1.1 -- Astrocytes are star-shaped cells characterized by the presence of glial filaments in their cytoplasm.

2.1.2 -- Astrocytes form an active bridge between neurons and the blood-brain barrier.

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Cellular and Molecular Neurophysiology by Hammond, Constance ©2008

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