The role of a highly conserved major facilitator superfamily member in Drosophila embryonic macrophage migration

By: Valoskova, Katarina
Material type: TextTextPublisher: IST Austria 2019Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Abstract
Acknowledgements
About the Author
List of Publications Appearing in Thesis
List of Figures
List of Tables
List of Symbols/Abbreviations
1 Introduction
2 Potential Players in invasive migration of embryonic macrophages of Drosophila melanogaster
3 A conserved Major Facilitator Superfamily member orchestrates a subset of glycosylation to aid macrophage tissue invasion
4 Future Directions
References
Summary: Invasive migration plays a crucial role not only during development and homeostasis but also in pathological states, such as tumor metastasis. Drosophila macrophage migration into the extended germband is an interesting system to study invasive migration. It carries similarities to immune cell transmigration and cancer cell invasion, therefore studying this process could also bring new understanding of invasion in higher organisms. In our work, we uncover a highly conserved member of the major facilitator family that plays a role in tissue invasion through regulation of glycosylation on a subgroup of proteins and/or by aiding the precise timing of DN-Cadherin downregulation. Aberrant display of the truncated core1 O-glycan T-antigen is a common feature of human cancer cells that correlates with metastasis. Here we show that T-antigen in Drosophila melanogaster macrophages is involved in their developmentally programmed tissue invasion. Higher macrophage T-antigen levels require an atypical major facilitator superfamily (MFS) member that we named Minerva which enables macrophage dissemination and invasion. We characterize for the first time the T and Tn glycoform O-glycoproteome of the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, and determine that Minerva increases the presence of T-antigen on proteins in pathways previously linked to cancer, most strongly on the sulfhydryl oxidase Qsox1 which we show is required for macrophage tissue entry. Minerva’s vertebrate ortholog, MFSD1, rescues the minerva mutant’s migration and T-antigen glycosylation defects. We thus identify a key conserved regulator that orchestrates O-glycosylation on a protein subset to activate a program governing migration steps important for both development and cancer metastasis.
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Thesis

Abstract

Acknowledgements

About the Author

List of Publications Appearing in Thesis

List of Figures

List of Tables

List of Symbols/Abbreviations

1 Introduction

2 Potential Players in invasive migration of embryonic macrophages of Drosophila melanogaster

3 A conserved Major Facilitator Superfamily member orchestrates a subset of glycosylation to aid macrophage tissue invasion

4 Future Directions

References

Invasive migration plays a crucial role not only during development and homeostasis but also in pathological states, such as tumor metastasis. Drosophila macrophage migration into the extended germband is an interesting system to study invasive migration. It carries similarities to immune cell transmigration and cancer cell invasion, therefore studying this process could also bring new understanding of invasion in higher organisms. In our work, we uncover a highly conserved member of the major facilitator family that plays a role in tissue invasion through regulation of glycosylation on a subgroup of proteins and/or by aiding the precise timing of DN-Cadherin downregulation. Aberrant display of the truncated core1 O-glycan T-antigen is a common feature of human cancer cells that correlates with metastasis. Here we show that T-antigen in Drosophila melanogaster macrophages is involved in their developmentally programmed tissue invasion. Higher macrophage T-antigen levels require an atypical major facilitator superfamily (MFS) member that we named Minerva which enables macrophage dissemination and invasion. We characterize for the first time the T and Tn glycoform O-glycoproteome of the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, and determine that Minerva increases the presence of T-antigen on proteins in pathways previously linked to cancer, most strongly on the sulfhydryl oxidase Qsox1 which we show is required for macrophage tissue entry. Minerva’s vertebrate ortholog, MFSD1, rescues the minerva mutant’s migration and T-antigen glycosylation defects. We thus identify a key conserved regulator that orchestrates O-glycosylation on a protein subset to activate a program governing migration steps important for both development and cancer metastasis.

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