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Security protocols : 11th international workshop, Cambridge, UK, April 2-4, 2003 : revised selected papers / Bruce Christianson [and others] (eds.).

By: (11th : International Workshop on Security Protocols (11th : 2003 : Cambridge, England)Contributor(s): Christianson, BruceMaterial type: TextTextPublisher number: 11542322Series: Serienbezeichnung | Lecture notes in computer science ; 3364.Publication details: Berlin ; New York : Springer, ©2005. Description: 1 online resource (ix, 349 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783540318361; 3540318364; 3540283897; 9783540283898Subject(s): Computer security -- Congresses | Computers -- Access control -- Congresses | Cryptography -- Congresses | Sécurité informatique -- Congrès | Ordinateurs -- Accès -- Contrôle -- Congrès | Cryptographie -- Congrès | COMPUTERS -- Internet -- Security | COMPUTERS -- Networking -- Security | COMPUTERS -- Security -- General | Informatique | Computer security | Computers -- Access control | Cryptography | Mobilfunk | Authentifikation | Telekommunikationsnetz | Mobile Computing | Sicherheitsprotokoll | Protocole de sécurité | Sécurité informatique | Cryptographie (Informatique) | Contrôle d'accès | IP | algoritmen | algorithms | computeranalyse | computer analysis | computers | samenleving | society | informatiesystemen | information systems | computerwetenschappen | computer sciences | computernetwerken | computer networks | gegevensbeheer | data management | operating systems | Information and Communication Technology (General) | Informatie- en communicatietechnologie (algemeen)Genre/Form: Electronic books. | Conference papers and proceedings. | Kongress. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Security protocols.DDC classification: 005.8 LOC classification: QA76.9.A25 | I574 2005ebOther classification: SS 4800 | 004 | DAT 460f | DAT 252f Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Where Have All the Protocols Gone? -- A Protocol's Life After Attacks ... -- A Protocol's Life After Attacks ... -- Towards Flexible Credential Negotiation Protocols -- Towards Flexible Credential Negotiation Protocols -- Man-in-the-Middle in Tunnelled Authentication Protocols -- Man-in-the-Middle in Tunnelled Authentication Protocols -- Towards a Framework for Autonomic Security Protocols -- Towards a Framework for Autonomic Security Protocols -- Client v. Server Side Protocols, Interfaces and Storage -- Client v. Server Side Protocols, Interfaces and Storage -- Guaranteeing Access in Spite of Distributed Service-Flooding Attacks -- Guaranteeing Access in Spite of Distributed Service-Flooding Attacks -- Protocol Codesign -- Protocol Codesign -- Enforcing Security Policies for Distributed Objects Applications -- Enforcing Security Policies for Distributed Objects Applications -- Regular SPKI -- Regular SPKI -- Federated Identity-Management Protocols -- Federated Identity-Management Protocols -- Enforcing the Unenforceable -- Is the Verification Problem for Cryptographic Protocols Solved? -- Secure Sessions from Weak Secrets -- Secure Sessions from Weak Secrets -- Panel Session: Is Protocol Modelling Finished? -- WAR: Wireless Anonymous Routing -- WAR: Wireless Anonymous Routing -- Limitations of IPsec Policy Mechanisms -- Limitations of IPsec Policy Mechanisms -- Deniable Authenticated Key Establishment for Internet Protocols -- Deniable Authenticated Key Establishment for Internet Protocols -- Protocols for Supporting a Public Key Infrastructure in Ad Hoc Networks -- Protocols for Supporting a Public Key Infrastructure in Ad Hoc Networks -- What We Can Learn from API Security -- Addressing New Challenges by Building Security Protocols Around Graphs -- From Security Protocols to Systems Security -- From Security Protocols to Systems Security -- Biometrics to Enhance Smartcard Security -- Biometrics to Enhance Smartcard Security -- Blind Publication: A Copyright Library without Publication or Trust -- Blind Publication: A Copyright Library Without Publication or Trust.
Summary: Greetings. These are the proceedings of the 11th in our series of International Workshops on Security Protocols. Our theme this time was "Where have all the Protocols gone?" Once upon a time security protocols lived mainly in the network and transport layers. Now they increasingly hide in applications, or in specialised hardware. Does this trend lead to better security architectures, or is it an indication that we are addressing the wrong problems? The intention of the workshops is to provide a forum where incompletely workedoutideascanstimulatediscussion, openupnewlinesofinvestigation, and suggestmoreproblems. The positionpaperspublished herehavebeen revisedby the authors in the light of their participation in the workshop. In addition, we publish edited transcripts of some of the discussions, to give our readers access to some of the roads ahead not (yet) taken. We hope that these revised position papers and edited transcripts will give you at least one interesting idea of your own to explore. Please do write and tell us what it was. Our purpose in publishing these proceedings is to produce a conceptual map which will be of enduring interest, rather than to be merely topical. This is perhaps just as well, given the delay in production. This year we moved to new computer-based recording technology, and of course it failed completely
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"11th in our series of International Workshops on Security Protocols"--Preface

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Where Have All the Protocols Gone? -- A Protocol's Life After Attacks ... -- A Protocol's Life After Attacks ... -- Towards Flexible Credential Negotiation Protocols -- Towards Flexible Credential Negotiation Protocols -- Man-in-the-Middle in Tunnelled Authentication Protocols -- Man-in-the-Middle in Tunnelled Authentication Protocols -- Towards a Framework for Autonomic Security Protocols -- Towards a Framework for Autonomic Security Protocols -- Client v. Server Side Protocols, Interfaces and Storage -- Client v. Server Side Protocols, Interfaces and Storage -- Guaranteeing Access in Spite of Distributed Service-Flooding Attacks -- Guaranteeing Access in Spite of Distributed Service-Flooding Attacks -- Protocol Codesign -- Protocol Codesign -- Enforcing Security Policies for Distributed Objects Applications -- Enforcing Security Policies for Distributed Objects Applications -- Regular SPKI -- Regular SPKI -- Federated Identity-Management Protocols -- Federated Identity-Management Protocols -- Enforcing the Unenforceable -- Is the Verification Problem for Cryptographic Protocols Solved? -- Secure Sessions from Weak Secrets -- Secure Sessions from Weak Secrets -- Panel Session: Is Protocol Modelling Finished? -- WAR: Wireless Anonymous Routing -- WAR: Wireless Anonymous Routing -- Limitations of IPsec Policy Mechanisms -- Limitations of IPsec Policy Mechanisms -- Deniable Authenticated Key Establishment for Internet Protocols -- Deniable Authenticated Key Establishment for Internet Protocols -- Protocols for Supporting a Public Key Infrastructure in Ad Hoc Networks -- Protocols for Supporting a Public Key Infrastructure in Ad Hoc Networks -- What We Can Learn from API Security -- Addressing New Challenges by Building Security Protocols Around Graphs -- From Security Protocols to Systems Security -- From Security Protocols to Systems Security -- Biometrics to Enhance Smartcard Security -- Biometrics to Enhance Smartcard Security -- Blind Publication: A Copyright Library without Publication or Trust -- Blind Publication: A Copyright Library Without Publication or Trust.

Greetings. These are the proceedings of the 11th in our series of International Workshops on Security Protocols. Our theme this time was "Where have all the Protocols gone?" Once upon a time security protocols lived mainly in the network and transport layers. Now they increasingly hide in applications, or in specialised hardware. Does this trend lead to better security architectures, or is it an indication that we are addressing the wrong problems? The intention of the workshops is to provide a forum where incompletely workedoutideascanstimulatediscussion, openupnewlinesofinvestigation, and suggestmoreproblems. The positionpaperspublished herehavebeen revisedby the authors in the light of their participation in the workshop. In addition, we publish edited transcripts of some of the discussions, to give our readers access to some of the roads ahead not (yet) taken. We hope that these revised position papers and edited transcripts will give you at least one interesting idea of your own to explore. Please do write and tell us what it was. Our purpose in publishing these proceedings is to produce a conceptual map which will be of enduring interest, rather than to be merely topical. This is perhaps just as well, given the delay in production. This year we moved to new computer-based recording technology, and of course it failed completely

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