Animal models of neurological disease. I, Neurodegenerative diseases / edited by Alan A. Boulton, Glen B. Baker and Roger F. Butterworth.

Contributor(s): Boulton, A. A. (Alan A.) [editor.] | Baker, Glen B, 1947- [editor.] | Butterworth, Roger F [editor.]
Material type: TextTextSeries: Neuromethods: 21,Publisher: Totowa, New Jersey : Humana Press, 1992Description: 1 online resource (380 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781592596263; 1592596266; 0896032086; 9780896032088Subject(s): Nervous system -- Animal models -- Diseases | Disease | Models, Biological | Models, Animal | Animal Diseases | Disease Models, Animal | Nervous System Diseases | Models, Theoretical | Investigative Techniques | Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and EquipmentGenre/Form: Electronic books. DDC classification: 616.8/0427 LOC classification: RC346.N48 1992ebOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
""Preface to the Series""; ""Preface to the Animal Models Volumes""; ""Preface""; ""Contents""; ""Ethics of Animal Models of Neurological Diseases""; ""Animal Models of Alzheimer�s Disease""; ""Animal Models of Huntington�s Disease""; ""Nongenetic Animal Models of Myelin Disorders""; ""Animal Models of the Cerebellar Ataxias""; ""Animal Models for Lesch-Nyhan Disease""; ""Index""
Summary: To the Animal Models Volumes This and several other volumes in the Neuromethods series will describe a number of animal models of neu- psychiatric disorders. Because of increasing public concern over the ethical treatment of animals in research, we felt it incumbent upon us to include this general preface to these volumes in order to indicate why we think further research using animals is necessary and why animal models of psychi- ric and neurologic disorders, in particular, are so important. We recognize that animals should only be used when suitable alternatives are not available. We think it self-e- dent, however, that humans can only be experimented upon in severely proscribed circumstances and alternative pro- dures using cell or tissue culture are inadequate in any models requiring assessments of behavioral change or of complex in vivo processes. However, when the distress, discomfort, or pain to the animals outweighs the anticipated gains for human welfare, then the research is not ethical and should not be carried out.
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""Preface to the Series""; ""Preface to the Animal Models Volumes""; ""Preface""; ""Contents""; ""Ethics of Animal Models of Neurological Diseases""; ""Animal Models of Alzheimer�s Disease""; ""Animal Models of Huntington�s Disease""; ""Nongenetic Animal Models of Myelin Disorders""; ""Animal Models of the Cerebellar Ataxias""; ""Animal Models for Lesch-Nyhan Disease""; ""Index""

English.

To the Animal Models Volumes This and several other volumes in the Neuromethods series will describe a number of animal models of neu- psychiatric disorders. Because of increasing public concern over the ethical treatment of animals in research, we felt it incumbent upon us to include this general preface to these volumes in order to indicate why we think further research using animals is necessary and why animal models of psychi- ric and neurologic disorders, in particular, are so important. We recognize that animals should only be used when suitable alternatives are not available. We think it self-e- dent, however, that humans can only be experimented upon in severely proscribed circumstances and alternative pro- dures using cell or tissue culture are inadequate in any models requiring assessments of behavioral change or of complex in vivo processes. However, when the distress, discomfort, or pain to the animals outweighs the anticipated gains for human welfare, then the research is not ethical and should not be carried out.

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