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Across the great border fault : the naturalist myth in America / Kevin Dann.

By: Dann, Kevin T, 1956-Material type: TextTextPublication details: New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, ©2000. Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 294 pages) : mapsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0585284822; 9780585284828; 0813566134; 9780813566139Subject(s): Natural history -- Philosophy | NATURE -- Essays | NATURE -- Reference | TRAVEL -- Special Interest -- Ecotourism | Natural history -- Philosophy | Biology | Health & Biological Sciences | Biology - GeneralGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Across the great border fault.DDC classification: 508/.0973 LOC classification: QH14.3 | .D36 2000ebOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Introduction : Back to (which) nature? -- Arcadia and metropolis -- On nature's trail : nature study at Harriman Park -- Science and the sensible -- Caught between nature and history -- Not an earthly service -- Spiritual science and the redemption of the senses -- Reenchanting nature : anthroposophical nature study -- Conclusion : The unity of knowledge.
Review: "In recent years scholars have begun to question the cultural values underlying how we view nature. Kevin Dann contributes to this debate by juxtaposing two radically different "Arcadian" experiments in the early twentieth century by Manhattanites seeking cultural renewal through contact with the natural world. Dann first looks at the initiatives of the American Museum of Natural History from 1910 to 1940 at Harriman State Park. He argues that these were expressions of the early, "back-to-nature" movement whose underlying biological materialism, or "Naturalism," was integral to American popular culture of the time." "These activities are contrasted with social experiments at nearby Threefold Farm in Ramapo, New York, where anthroposophists - followers of Rudolf Steiner's "spiritual science"--Developed a program of natural scientific research and education in opposition to Darwinism and its social applications as well as reductionist scientific methods. By challenging scientific "fact" with spiritual scientific descriptions, the Threefold Farm initiative offered Americans a new gospel of nature."--Jacket.
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 269-283) and index.

"In recent years scholars have begun to question the cultural values underlying how we view nature. Kevin Dann contributes to this debate by juxtaposing two radically different "Arcadian" experiments in the early twentieth century by Manhattanites seeking cultural renewal through contact with the natural world. Dann first looks at the initiatives of the American Museum of Natural History from 1910 to 1940 at Harriman State Park. He argues that these were expressions of the early, "back-to-nature" movement whose underlying biological materialism, or "Naturalism," was integral to American popular culture of the time." "These activities are contrasted with social experiments at nearby Threefold Farm in Ramapo, New York, where anthroposophists - followers of Rudolf Steiner's "spiritual science"--Developed a program of natural scientific research and education in opposition to Darwinism and its social applications as well as reductionist scientific methods. By challenging scientific "fact" with spiritual scientific descriptions, the Threefold Farm initiative offered Americans a new gospel of nature."--Jacket.

Introduction : Back to (which) nature? -- Arcadia and metropolis -- On nature's trail : nature study at Harriman Park -- Science and the sensible -- Caught between nature and history -- Not an earthly service -- Spiritual science and the redemption of the senses -- Reenchanting nature : anthroposophical nature study -- Conclusion : The unity of knowledge.

Print version record.

English.

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