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Gotham unbound : how New York City was liberated from the grip of organized crime / James B. Jacobs with Coleen Friel and Robert Radick.

By: Jacobs, James BContributor(s): Friel, Coleen | Radick, RobertMaterial type: TextTextPublication details: New York : New York University Press, ©1999. Description: 1 online resource (x, 329 pages) : mapsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0585325413; 9780585325415; 9780814737965; 081473796X; 9780814742464; 0814742467Subject(s): Racketeering -- New York (State) -- New York | Mafia -- New York (State) -- New York | Business enterprises -- Corrupt practices -- New York (State) -- New York | Organized crime investigation -- New York (State) -- New York | TRUE CRIME -- Organized Crime | Business enterprises -- Corrupt practices | Mafia | Organized crime investigation | Racketeering | New York (State) -- New York | Georganiseerde misdaad | New York (stad)Genre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Gotham unbound.DDC classification: 364.1/06097471 LOC classification: HV6452.N72 | M345 1999ebOther classification: 86.42 | 86.42. Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
A Cosa Nostra outfit: seven decades of mob rule in the garment district -- Fishy business: the Mafia and the Fulton Fish market -- The taking of John F. Kennedy Airport -- Exhibiting corruption: the Javits Convention Center -- Carting away a fortune: Cosa Nostra and the waste-hauling industry -- Building a Cosa Nostra fiefdom: the construction industry -- Conclusion to part I -- Liberating the garment district -- Freeing the Fulton Fish Market -- Purging the mob from John F. Kennedy Airport -- Ridding the Javits Convention Center of organized crime -- Defeating Cosa Nostra in the waste-hauling industry -- Cleansing the construction industry -- Conclusion to part II.
Summary: Cosa Nostra. Organized crime. The Mob. Call it what you like, no other crime group has infiltrated labor unions and manipulated legitimate industries like Italian organized crime families. One cannot understand the history and political economy of New York City-or most other major American cities-in the 20th century without focusing on the role of organized crime in the urban power structure. Gotham Unbound demonstrates the remarkable range of Cosa Nostra's activities and influence and convincingly argues that 20th century organized crime has been no minor annoyance at the periphery of soci.
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 311-314) and index.

Print version record.

A Cosa Nostra outfit: seven decades of mob rule in the garment district -- Fishy business: the Mafia and the Fulton Fish market -- The taking of John F. Kennedy Airport -- Exhibiting corruption: the Javits Convention Center -- Carting away a fortune: Cosa Nostra and the waste-hauling industry -- Building a Cosa Nostra fiefdom: the construction industry -- Conclusion to part I -- Liberating the garment district -- Freeing the Fulton Fish Market -- Purging the mob from John F. Kennedy Airport -- Ridding the Javits Convention Center of organized crime -- Defeating Cosa Nostra in the waste-hauling industry -- Cleansing the construction industry -- Conclusion to part II.

Cosa Nostra. Organized crime. The Mob. Call it what you like, no other crime group has infiltrated labor unions and manipulated legitimate industries like Italian organized crime families. One cannot understand the history and political economy of New York City-or most other major American cities-in the 20th century without focusing on the role of organized crime in the urban power structure. Gotham Unbound demonstrates the remarkable range of Cosa Nostra's activities and influence and convincingly argues that 20th century organized crime has been no minor annoyance at the periphery of soci.

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