Amazon cover image
Image from Amazon.com

Making love modern : the intimate public worlds of New York's literary women / Nina Miller.

By: Miller, Nina, 1958-Material type: TextTextPublication details: New York : Oxford University Press, 1999. Description: 1 online resource (ix, 292 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0585328447; 9780585328447; 9780195116052; 0195116054; 1280470100; 9781280470103; 9780195116045; 0195116046; 9786610470105; 6610470103Subject(s): American literature -- New York (State) -- New York -- History and criticism | Feminism and literature -- New York (State) -- New York -- History -- 20th century | Women and literature -- New York (State) -- New York -- History -- 20th century | Women authors, American -- New York (State) -- New York -- Biography | Love poetry, American -- Women authors -- History and criticism | American literature -- Women authors -- History and criticism | American literature -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Women -- New York (State) -- New York -- Intellectual life | Modernism (Literature) -- New York (State) -- New York | Feminist poetry -- History and criticism | LITERARY CRITICISM -- American -- General | American literature | American literature -- Women authors | Feminism and literature | Feminist poetry | Love poetry, American -- Women authors | Modernism (Literature) | Women and literature | Women authors, American | Women -- Intellectual life | New York (State) -- New York | 1900-1999Genre/Form: Electronic book. | Electronic books. | History. | Biographies. | Criticism, interpretation, etc. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Making love modern.DDC classification: 810.9/9287/097471 LOC classification: PS255.N5 | M55 1999ebOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Edna St. Vincent Millay -- Love in Greenwich Village: Genevieve Taggard and the Bohemian ideal -- Aestheticized love and sexual violence -- The Algonquin round table and the politics of sophistication -- "Oh, do sit down, I've got so much to tell you!": Dorothy Parker and her intimate public -- "The new (and newer) Negro(es)": generational conflict in the Harlem Renaissance -- "Exalting Negro womanhood": performance and cultural responsibility for the middle-class heroine -- "Our younger Negro (women) artists": Gwendolyn Bennett and Helene Johnson.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserveSummary: In the teens and twenties, New York was home to a rich variety of literary subcultures. Within these intermingled worlds, gender lines and other boundaries were crossed in ways hardly imaginable in previous decades. Among the bohemians of Greenwich Village, the sophisticates of the Algonquin Round Table and the literati of the Harlem Renaissance, certain women found fresh, powerful voices through which to speak and write. Edna St. Vincent Millay and Dorothy Parker are now best remembered for their colourful lives; Genevieve Taggard, Gwendolyn Bennett, and Helene Johnson are hardly remembered at all. Yet each made a serious literary contribution to the meaning of modern femininity, relationship, and selfhood. Making Love Modern uncovers the deep historical sensitivity and interest of these women's love poetry. Placing their work in the context of subcultures nested within national culture, Nina Miller explores the tensions that make this literature so rewarding for contemporary readers. A poetry of intimate expression, it also functioned powerfully as public assertion.; The writers themselves were high-profile embodiments of femininity, the local representatives of New Womanhood within their male-centred subcultural worlds. Making Love Modern captures the literary lives of these women as well as the complex subcultures they inhabited-Harlem, the Village, and glamorous Midtown. In the end, the book is a much a study of modernist New York as of women's love poetry during modernism.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Star ratings
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Holdings
Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
eBook eBook e-Library

Electronic Book@IST

EBook Available
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (pages 247-284) and index.

Edna St. Vincent Millay -- Love in Greenwich Village: Genevieve Taggard and the Bohemian ideal -- Aestheticized love and sexual violence -- The Algonquin round table and the politics of sophistication -- "Oh, do sit down, I've got so much to tell you!": Dorothy Parker and her intimate public -- "The new (and newer) Negro(es)": generational conflict in the Harlem Renaissance -- "Exalting Negro womanhood": performance and cultural responsibility for the middle-class heroine -- "Our younger Negro (women) artists": Gwendolyn Bennett and Helene Johnson.

In the teens and twenties, New York was home to a rich variety of literary subcultures. Within these intermingled worlds, gender lines and other boundaries were crossed in ways hardly imaginable in previous decades. Among the bohemians of Greenwich Village, the sophisticates of the Algonquin Round Table and the literati of the Harlem Renaissance, certain women found fresh, powerful voices through which to speak and write. Edna St. Vincent Millay and Dorothy Parker are now best remembered for their colourful lives; Genevieve Taggard, Gwendolyn Bennett, and Helene Johnson are hardly remembered at all. Yet each made a serious literary contribution to the meaning of modern femininity, relationship, and selfhood. Making Love Modern uncovers the deep historical sensitivity and interest of these women's love poetry. Placing their work in the context of subcultures nested within national culture, Nina Miller explores the tensions that make this literature so rewarding for contemporary readers. A poetry of intimate expression, it also functioned powerfully as public assertion.; The writers themselves were high-profile embodiments of femininity, the local representatives of New Womanhood within their male-centred subcultural worlds. Making Love Modern captures the literary lives of these women as well as the complex subcultures they inhabited-Harlem, the Village, and glamorous Midtown. In the end, the book is a much a study of modernist New York as of women's love poetry during modernism.

Print version record.

Use copy Restrictions unspecified star MiAaHDL

Electronic reproduction. [Place of publication not identified] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

digitized 2010 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda MiAaHDL

Powered by Koha