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Temples for tomorrow : looking back at the Harlem Renaissance / edited by Geneviáeve Fabre and Michel Feith.

Contributor(s): Fabre, Geneviève | Feith, Michel, 1966-Material type: TextTextPublication details: Bloomington : Indiana University Press, ©2001. Description: 1 online resource (x, 392 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0253109108; 9780253109101; 0253328861; 9780253328861; 0253214254; 9780253214256; 1282062883; 9781282062887Subject(s): American literature -- African American authors -- History and criticism | American literature -- New York (State) -- New York -- History and criticism | African Americans -- New York (State) -- New York -- Intellectual life | American literature -- 20th century -- History and criticism | African American arts -- New York (State) -- New York | African Americans in literature | Harlem Renaissance | Littérature américaine -- Auteurs noirs américains -- Histoire et critique | Littérature américaine -- New York (État) -- New York -- Histoire et critique | Noirs américains -- New York (État) -- New York -- Vie intellectuelle | Littérature américaine -- 20e siècle -- Histoire et critique | Arts noirs américains -- New York (État) -- New York | Noirs américains dans la littérature | Harlem Renaissance | LITERARY CRITICISM -- American -- General | African American arts | African Americans in literature | African Americans -- Intellectual life | American literature | American literature -- African American authors | Harlem Renaissance | New York (State) -- New York | Harlem renaissance | Aufsatzsammlung | American Literature | English | Languages & Literatures | 1900-1999Genre/Form: Electronic books. | Criticism, interpretation, etc. | Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Temples for tomorrow.DDC classification: 810.9/89607471 LOC classification: PS153.N5 | T45 2001ebOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
"Temples for tomorrow": introductory essay / Geneviv̈e Fabre and Michel Feith -- Racial doubt and racial shame in the Harlem Renaissance / Arnold Rampersad -- The syncopated African: constructions of origins in the Harlem Renaissance (literature, music, visual arts) / Michel Feith -- Oh Africa! The influence of African art during the Harlem Renaissance / Amy H. Kirschke -- Florence B. Price's "Negro symphony" / Rae Linda Brown -- Ethel Waters: the voice of an era / Randall Cherry -- Oscar Micheaux and the Harlem Renaissance / Clyde Taylor -- The tragedy and the joke: James Weldon Johnson's The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man / Alessandro Portelli -- "The spell of Africa is upon me": W.E.B. DuBois's notion of art as propaganda / Alessandra Lorini -- Subject to disappearance: interracial identity in Nella Larsen's Quicksand / George Hutchinson -- No free gifts: Toomer's "Fern" and the Harlem Renaissance / William Boelhower -- Harlem as a memory place: reconstructing the Harlem Renaissance in space / Dorothea Lb̲bermann -- "A basin in the mind": language in Their Eyes Were Watching God / Claudine Raynaud -- Langston Hughes's blues / Monica Michlin -- The tropics in New York: Claude McKay and the new Negro movement / Carl Pedersen -- The West Indian presence in Alain Locke's The New Negro (1925) / Franȯise Charras -- Three ways to translate the Harlem Renaissance / Brent Hayes Edwards -- The Harlem Renaissance abroad: French critics and the new Negro literary movement (1924-1964) / Michel Fabre.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserveSummary: The Harlem Renaissance is rightly considered a moment of creative exuberance and unprecedented explosion in the African American world of arts and letters. Today, there is a renewed interest in this movement, calling for a reevaluation and a closer scrutiny of the participants. Temples for Tomorrow reconsiders the period between two world wars which confirmed the intuitions of W.E.B. DuBois on the 'color line' and gave birth to the 'American dilemma', later evoked by Gunnar Myrdal.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

"Temples for tomorrow": introductory essay / Geneviv̈e Fabre and Michel Feith -- Racial doubt and racial shame in the Harlem Renaissance / Arnold Rampersad -- The syncopated African: constructions of origins in the Harlem Renaissance (literature, music, visual arts) / Michel Feith -- Oh Africa! The influence of African art during the Harlem Renaissance / Amy H. Kirschke -- Florence B. Price's "Negro symphony" / Rae Linda Brown -- Ethel Waters: the voice of an era / Randall Cherry -- Oscar Micheaux and the Harlem Renaissance / Clyde Taylor -- The tragedy and the joke: James Weldon Johnson's The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man / Alessandro Portelli -- "The spell of Africa is upon me": W.E.B. DuBois's notion of art as propaganda / Alessandra Lorini -- Subject to disappearance: interracial identity in Nella Larsen's Quicksand / George Hutchinson -- No free gifts: Toomer's "Fern" and the Harlem Renaissance / William Boelhower -- Harlem as a memory place: reconstructing the Harlem Renaissance in space / Dorothea Lb̲bermann -- "A basin in the mind": language in Their Eyes Were Watching God / Claudine Raynaud -- Langston Hughes's blues / Monica Michlin -- The tropics in New York: Claude McKay and the new Negro movement / Carl Pedersen -- The West Indian presence in Alain Locke's The New Negro (1925) / Franȯise Charras -- Three ways to translate the Harlem Renaissance / Brent Hayes Edwards -- The Harlem Renaissance abroad: French critics and the new Negro literary movement (1924-1964) / Michel Fabre.

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Print version record.

The Harlem Renaissance is rightly considered a moment of creative exuberance and unprecedented explosion in the African American world of arts and letters. Today, there is a renewed interest in this movement, calling for a reevaluation and a closer scrutiny of the participants. Temples for Tomorrow reconsiders the period between two world wars which confirmed the intuitions of W.E.B. DuBois on the 'color line' and gave birth to the 'American dilemma', later evoked by Gunnar Myrdal.

English.

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