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Communications policy in transition : the Internet and beyond / edited by Benjamin M. Compaine and Shane Greenstein.

Contributor(s): Compaine, Benjamin M | Greenstein, Shane M | Telecommunications Policy Research Conference (28th : 2000 : Alexandria, Va.)Material type: TextTextSeries: Telecommunications policy researchPublication details: Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, ©2001. Description: 1 online resource (xxii, 425 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780262270717; 0262270714; 0585446490; 9780585446493; 0262293390; 9780262293396Subject(s): Communication policy -- United States -- Congresses | Internet -- United States -- Congresses | Telecommunication policy -- United States -- Congresses | LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES -- Communication Studies | Communication policy | Internet | Telecommunication policy | United States | Telecommunicatie | Internet | Overheidsbeleid | Verenigde Staten | Journalism & Communications | Communication & Mass Media | INFORMATION SCIENCE/Technology & PolicyGenre/Form: Conference papers and proceedings. | Congressen (vorm) | Electronic books. | Electronic books. | Conference papers and proceedings. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Communications policy in transition.DDC classification: 302.2 LOC classification: P95.82.U6 | C66 2001ebOther classification: 05.20 | 54.00 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Where internet service providers and telephone companies compete: a guide to the Computer inquiries, enhanced service providers, and information service providers / Robert Cannon -- Broadband architectures, ISP business plans, and open access / Shawn O'Donnell -- Regulatory treatment of IP transport and services / Joshua L. Mindel and Marvin A. Sirbu -- Rethinking the design of the internet: the end-to-end arguments vs. the brave new world / Marjory S. Blumenthal and David D. Clark -- The InterNAT: policy implications of the internet architecture debate / Hans Kruse, William Yurcik, and Lawrence Lessig -- The potential for scrutiny of internet peering policies in multilateral forums / Rob Frieden -- Wireline vs. wireless internet access: comparing the United States and Japan -- Emily Moto Murase -- Developing telecommunications infrastructure: state and local policy collisions / Sharon Strover and Lon Berquist -- From C to shining C: competition and cross-subsidy in communications / Gregory L. Rosston and Bradley S. Wimmer -- Unexpected outcomes in digital divide policy: what children really do in the public library / Christian Sandvig -- Accessibility of broadband telecommunications services by various segments of the American population / David Gabel and Florence Kwan -- Reexamining the digital divide / Benjamin M. Compaine -- Sorting out the search engine market / Neil Gandal -- Copyright in the age of distributed applications / Seth D. Greenstein -- Should congress establish a compulsory license for internet video providers to retransmit over-the-air TV station programming via the internet? / Michael Wirth and Larry Collette.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserveSummary: Until the 1980s, it was presumed that technical change in most communications services could easily be monitored from centralized state and federal agencies. This presumption was long outdated prior to the commercialization of the Internet. With the Internet, the long-forecast convergence of voice, video, and text bits became a reality. Legislation, capped by the Telecommunications Act of 1996, created new quasi-standards such as "fair" and "reasonable" for the FCC and courts to apply, leading to nonstop litigation and occasional gridlock. This book addresses some of the many telecommunications areas on which public policy makers, corporate strategists, and social activists must reach agreement. Topics include the regulation of access, Internet architecture in a commercial era, communications infrastructure development, the Digital Divide, and information policy issues such as intellectual property and the retransmission of TV programming via the Internet.
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Papers from the 28th Telecommunications Policy Research Conference held in Alexandria, Va. in the Fall of 2000.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Where internet service providers and telephone companies compete: a guide to the Computer inquiries, enhanced service providers, and information service providers / Robert Cannon -- Broadband architectures, ISP business plans, and open access / Shawn O'Donnell -- Regulatory treatment of IP transport and services / Joshua L. Mindel and Marvin A. Sirbu -- Rethinking the design of the internet: the end-to-end arguments vs. the brave new world / Marjory S. Blumenthal and David D. Clark -- The InterNAT: policy implications of the internet architecture debate / Hans Kruse, William Yurcik, and Lawrence Lessig -- The potential for scrutiny of internet peering policies in multilateral forums / Rob Frieden -- Wireline vs. wireless internet access: comparing the United States and Japan -- Emily Moto Murase -- Developing telecommunications infrastructure: state and local policy collisions / Sharon Strover and Lon Berquist -- From C to shining C: competition and cross-subsidy in communications / Gregory L. Rosston and Bradley S. Wimmer -- Unexpected outcomes in digital divide policy: what children really do in the public library / Christian Sandvig -- Accessibility of broadband telecommunications services by various segments of the American population / David Gabel and Florence Kwan -- Reexamining the digital divide / Benjamin M. Compaine -- Sorting out the search engine market / Neil Gandal -- Copyright in the age of distributed applications / Seth D. Greenstein -- Should congress establish a compulsory license for internet video providers to retransmit over-the-air TV station programming via the internet? / Michael Wirth and Larry Collette.

Print version record.

Use copy Restrictions unspecified star MiAaHDL

Electronic reproduction. [S.l.] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

digitized 2010 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda MiAaHDL

Until the 1980s, it was presumed that technical change in most communications services could easily be monitored from centralized state and federal agencies. This presumption was long outdated prior to the commercialization of the Internet. With the Internet, the long-forecast convergence of voice, video, and text bits became a reality. Legislation, capped by the Telecommunications Act of 1996, created new quasi-standards such as "fair" and "reasonable" for the FCC and courts to apply, leading to nonstop litigation and occasional gridlock. This book addresses some of the many telecommunications areas on which public policy makers, corporate strategists, and social activists must reach agreement. Topics include the regulation of access, Internet architecture in a commercial era, communications infrastructure development, the Digital Divide, and information policy issues such as intellectual property and the retransmission of TV programming via the Internet.

English.

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