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Being real : the student-teacher relationship and African-American male delinquency / Camille Gibson.

By: Gibson, Camille, 1971-Material type: TextTextSeries: Criminal justice (LFB Scholarly Publishing LLC)Publication details: New York : LFB Scholarly Pub., 2002. Description: 1 online resource (ix, 331 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 1593320329; 9781593320324Subject(s): African American teenage boys -- Education (Secondary) -- New York (State) -- New York -- Case studies | Teacher-student relationships -- New York (State) -- New York -- Case studies | African American juvenile delinquents | EDUCATION -- Secondary | African American juvenile delinquents | Teacher-student relationships | New York (State) -- New YorkGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books. | Case studies. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Being real.DDC classification: 373.1829/96/073 LOC classification: LC2803.N65 | G53 2002ebOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cause for concern -- What we know -- A researcher investigates -- The social, political, and economic contexts -- The school players -- Student-teacher interactions -- Student outcomes -- What's to be done.
Summary: Gibson examines the role of school teachers in helping African-American juveniles not only to learn but also to acquire the social and cultural skills to avoid delinquency and attain upward social mobility. Gibson looks at how student-teacher relationships affect African American males. She studied students in two Bronx, New York, schools. African-American males may start optimistic, but they often come to perceive school as a poor option for achieving the "American dream." Instead, they may turn to crime, most often drug dealing and violence. Gibson's work shows how teachers affect this process. Teachers are most effective when they are "real": caring and willing to share of themselves as they pass on not only the subject matter of the class but also the social and cultural capital necessary to maximize their students chances at upward social mobility.
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 303-322) and index.

Cause for concern -- What we know -- A researcher investigates -- The social, political, and economic contexts -- The school players -- Student-teacher interactions -- Student outcomes -- What's to be done.

Print version record.

Gibson examines the role of school teachers in helping African-American juveniles not only to learn but also to acquire the social and cultural skills to avoid delinquency and attain upward social mobility. Gibson looks at how student-teacher relationships affect African American males. She studied students in two Bronx, New York, schools. African-American males may start optimistic, but they often come to perceive school as a poor option for achieving the "American dream." Instead, they may turn to crime, most often drug dealing and violence. Gibson's work shows how teachers affect this process. Teachers are most effective when they are "real": caring and willing to share of themselves as they pass on not only the subject matter of the class but also the social and cultural capital necessary to maximize their students chances at upward social mobility.

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