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Masks of the universe : changing ideas on the nature of the cosmos / Edward Harrison.

By: Harrison, Edward RobertMaterial type: TextTextPublication details: Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2003. Edition: 2nd edDescription: 1 online resource (ix, 331 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0511077726; 9780511077722; 9780511536564; 0511536569Subject(s): Cosmology | SCIENCE -- Cosmology | Cosmology | Kosmologie | Astronomy & Astrophysics | Physical Sciences & Mathematics | Astrophysics | Cosmologie | Univers -- HistoireGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Masks of the universe.DDC classification: 523.1 LOC classification: QB981 | .H324 2003ebOther classification: US 2000 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Introducing the masks -- Part I. Worlds in the Making: -- The magic Universe -- The mythic Universe -- The geometric Universe -- The medieval Universe -- The infinite Universe -- The mechanistic Universe -- Part II. The Heart Divine: -- Dance of the atoms and waves -- Fabric of space and time -- What then is time? -- Nearer to the heart's desire -- The cosmic tide -- Do dreams come true? -- Part III. The Cloud of Unknowing: -- The witch Universe -- The spear of Archytas -- All that is made -- The cloud of unknowing -- Learned ignorance.
Summary: To the ancient Greeks the universe consisted of earth, air, fire, and water. To Saint Augustine it was the Word of God. To many modern scientists it is the dance of atoms and waves, and in years to come it may be different again. What then is the real Universe? History shows that in every age each society constructs its own universe, believing it to be the real and final Universe. Yet each universe is only a model or mask of the unknown Universe. Originally published in 2003, this book brings together fundamental scientific, philosophical, and religious issues in cosmology, raising thought-provoking questions. In every age people have pitied the universes of their ancestors, convinced that they have at last discovered the ultimate truth. Does the modern model stand at the threshold of discovering everything, or will it, like all the rest, come to be pitied?
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 311-323) and index.

Introducing the masks -- Part I. Worlds in the Making: -- The magic Universe -- The mythic Universe -- The geometric Universe -- The medieval Universe -- The infinite Universe -- The mechanistic Universe -- Part II. The Heart Divine: -- Dance of the atoms and waves -- Fabric of space and time -- What then is time? -- Nearer to the heart's desire -- The cosmic tide -- Do dreams come true? -- Part III. The Cloud of Unknowing: -- The witch Universe -- The spear of Archytas -- All that is made -- The cloud of unknowing -- Learned ignorance.

Print version record.

To the ancient Greeks the universe consisted of earth, air, fire, and water. To Saint Augustine it was the Word of God. To many modern scientists it is the dance of atoms and waves, and in years to come it may be different again. What then is the real Universe? History shows that in every age each society constructs its own universe, believing it to be the real and final Universe. Yet each universe is only a model or mask of the unknown Universe. Originally published in 2003, this book brings together fundamental scientific, philosophical, and religious issues in cosmology, raising thought-provoking questions. In every age people have pitied the universes of their ancestors, convinced that they have at last discovered the ultimate truth. Does the modern model stand at the threshold of discovering everything, or will it, like all the rest, come to be pitied?

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