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The strike that changed New York : blacks, whites, and the Ocean Hill-Brownsville crisis / Jerald E. Podair.

By: Podair, Jerald E, 1953- [author.]Material type: TextTextPublication details: New Haven : Yale University Press, ©2002. Description: 1 online resource (xi, 273 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780300130706; 0300130708Subject(s): Ocean Hill-Brownsville Demonstration School District (New York, N.Y.) | Ocean Hill-Brownsville Demonstration School District (New York, N.Y.) | Strikes and lockouts -- Teachers -- New York (State) -- New York | Discrimination in education -- New York (State) -- New York | BUSINESS & ECONOMICS -- Labor | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Labor & Industrial Relations | Discrimination in education | Strikes and lockouts -- Teachers | New York (State) -- New YorkGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Strike that changed New York.DDC classification: 331.892/813711/0097471 LOC classification: LB2844.47.U62 | N4867 2002ebOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Two New Yorks : New York City, 1945-1965 -- The rise of community -- "Black" values, "white" values : race and culture in New York City during the 1960s -- The Ocean Hill-Brownsville community control experiment -- The strikes -- Like strangers : the third strike and beyond -- Culture war -- After the crisis : race and memory.
Summary: On May 9, 1968, junior high school teacher Fred Nauman received a letter that would change the history of New York City. It informed him that he had been fired from his job. Eighteen other educators in the Ocean Hill-Brownsville area of Brooklyn received similar letters that day. The dismissed educators were white. The local school board that fired them was predominantly African-American. The crisis that the firings provoked became the most racially divisive moment in the city in more than a century, sparking three teachers' strikes and increasingly angry confrontations between black and white New Yorkers at bargaining tables, on picket lines, and in the streets. This superb book revisits the Ocean Hill-Brownsville crisis-a watershed in modern New York City race relations. Jerald E. Podair connects the conflict with the sociocultural history of the city and explores its legacy. The book is a powerful, sobering tale of racial misunderstanding and fear, a New York story with national implications.
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 249-260) and index.

Two New Yorks : New York City, 1945-1965 -- The rise of community -- "Black" values, "white" values : race and culture in New York City during the 1960s -- The Ocean Hill-Brownsville community control experiment -- The strikes -- Like strangers : the third strike and beyond -- Culture war -- After the crisis : race and memory.

Print version record.

On May 9, 1968, junior high school teacher Fred Nauman received a letter that would change the history of New York City. It informed him that he had been fired from his job. Eighteen other educators in the Ocean Hill-Brownsville area of Brooklyn received similar letters that day. The dismissed educators were white. The local school board that fired them was predominantly African-American. The crisis that the firings provoked became the most racially divisive moment in the city in more than a century, sparking three teachers' strikes and increasingly angry confrontations between black and white New Yorkers at bargaining tables, on picket lines, and in the streets. This superb book revisits the Ocean Hill-Brownsville crisis-a watershed in modern New York City race relations. Jerald E. Podair connects the conflict with the sociocultural history of the city and explores its legacy. The book is a powerful, sobering tale of racial misunderstanding and fear, a New York story with national implications.

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