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Desire for development : whiteness, gender, and the helping imperative / Barbara Heron.

By: Heron, Barbara, 1949-Material type: TextTextPublication details: Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2007. Description: 1 online resource (x, 191 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781554580989; 1554580986; 1282166999; 9781282166998; 9786613810069; 6613810061Subject(s): Women, White -- Developing countries | Women, White -- Race identity | Women in development -- Developing countries | Power (Social sciences) | Economic development -- Social aspects | Imperialism | Business | Social sciences | Blanches -- Pays en voie de développement | Blanches -- Identité ethnique | Femmes dans le développement -- Pays en voie de développement | Pouvoir (Sciences sociales) | Développement économique -- Aspect social | Impérialisme | Blanches -- Pays en voie de développement | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Minority Studies | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Discrimination & Race Relations | Social sciences | Business | Economic development -- Social aspects | Imperialism | Power (Social sciences) | Women in development | Women, White | Developing countries | Ethnische Identität | Soziale Situation | Wirtschaftliche Lage | Weibliche Weiße | Entwicklungsländer | Blanches -- Pays en voie de développement | Blanches -- Identité ethnique | Femmes dans le développement -- Pays en voie de développement | Pouvoir (Sciences sociales) | Développement économique -- Aspect social | Impérialisme | FrauGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Desire for development.DDC classification: 305.48/9622 LOC classification: HD82 | .H434 2007ebOther classification: cci1icc | coll11 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Challenging the development work(er) narrative -- Where do development workers really come from? -- Development is ... a relational experience -- Negotiating subject positions, constituting selves -- Participants' retrospectives : complicating desire -- Summing up, drawing conclusions.
Review: "In Desire for Development: Whiteness, Gender, and the Helping Imperative, Barbara Heron draws on poststructuralist notions of subjectivity, critical race and space theory, feminism, colonial and postcolonial studies, and travel writing to trace colonial continuities in the post-development recollections of white Canadian women who have worked in Africa. Following the narrative arc of the development worker story through the decision to go overseas to the experiences abroad, the return home, and final reflections, the book interweaves theory with the words of the participants to bring theory to life and to generate new understandings of whiteness and development work." "Heron reveals how the desire for development is about the making of self in terms that are highly raced, classed, and gendered, and she exposes the moral core of this self and its seemingly paradoxical necessity to the Other. The construction of white female subjectivity is thereby revealed as contingent on notions of goodness and Othering played out against, and constituted by, the backdrop of the North-South binary, in which Canada's national narrative situates us as the "good guys" of the world."--Jacket.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Challenging the development work(er) narrative -- Where do development workers really come from? -- Development is ... a relational experience -- Negotiating subject positions, constituting selves -- Participants' retrospectives : complicating desire -- Summing up, drawing conclusions.

"In Desire for Development: Whiteness, Gender, and the Helping Imperative, Barbara Heron draws on poststructuralist notions of subjectivity, critical race and space theory, feminism, colonial and postcolonial studies, and travel writing to trace colonial continuities in the post-development recollections of white Canadian women who have worked in Africa. Following the narrative arc of the development worker story through the decision to go overseas to the experiences abroad, the return home, and final reflections, the book interweaves theory with the words of the participants to bring theory to life and to generate new understandings of whiteness and development work." "Heron reveals how the desire for development is about the making of self in terms that are highly raced, classed, and gendered, and she exposes the moral core of this self and its seemingly paradoxical necessity to the Other. The construction of white female subjectivity is thereby revealed as contingent on notions of goodness and Othering played out against, and constituted by, the backdrop of the North-South binary, in which Canada's national narrative situates us as the "good guys" of the world."--Jacket.

Print version record.

English.

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