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Comparative treatments for borderline personality disorder / Arthur Freeman, Mark H. Stone, Donna Martin, editors.

Contributor(s): Freeman, Arthur, 1942- | Stone, Mark H | Martin, Donna, 1954-Material type: TextTextSeries: Springer series on comparative treatments for psychological disordersPublication details: New York, NY : Springer, 2005. Description: 1 online resource (ix, 303 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780826148360; 0826148360; 0826120946; 9780826120946; 1281964352; 9781281964359; 9786611964351; 6611964355Subject(s): Borderline personality disorder | Borderline personality disorder -- Treatment | État-limite (Psychiatrie) | État-limite (Psychiatrie) -- Traitement | PSYCHOLOGY -- Mental Illness | Borderline personality disorder | Borderline personality disorder -- Treatment | Borderline persoonlijkheid | Behandeling | Borderline-Persönlichkeitsstörung | Psychotherapie | Methods | Psychotherapy | Therapeutics | Borderline Personality DisorderGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic book. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Comparative treatments for borderline personality disorder.DDC classification: 616.85/85206 LOC classification: RC569.5.B67 | C655 2005ebNLM classification: 2005 A-169 | WM 190Other classification: 44.91 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Contents; Contributors; Acknowledgments; 1. Introduction: A Review of Borderline Personality Disorder; 2. Case History of a Borderline Personality: Linda P.; 3. Self-Psychological Treatment; 4. Dialectical Behavior Therapy; 5. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy; 6. Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy; 7. Borderline States and Individual Psychology; 8. A Cognitive-Developmental Formulation of BPD; 9. A Lacanian Approach; 10. Imagery Rescripting and Reprocessing Therapy; 11. Unified Therapy with BPD; 12. Similarities and Differences in Treatment Modalities; Index.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserveSummary: Within the field of clinical psychology, the term borderline personality disorder was developed to fulfill a diagnostic need and has come to possess specific stereotypes and negative meanings. Because the term borderline is an emotionally charged word, it can lead to a less-than-accurate view of the situation or patient being described, thus presenting a challenge to even the most experienced therapists and becoming one of the most complex disorders to treat. Through the use of one case study, however, experts in borderline personality disorders have put this difficulty at ease. Applying a var.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

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Electronic reproduction. [S.l.] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

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Contents; Contributors; Acknowledgments; 1. Introduction: A Review of Borderline Personality Disorder; 2. Case History of a Borderline Personality: Linda P.; 3. Self-Psychological Treatment; 4. Dialectical Behavior Therapy; 5. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy; 6. Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy; 7. Borderline States and Individual Psychology; 8. A Cognitive-Developmental Formulation of BPD; 9. A Lacanian Approach; 10. Imagery Rescripting and Reprocessing Therapy; 11. Unified Therapy with BPD; 12. Similarities and Differences in Treatment Modalities; Index.

Within the field of clinical psychology, the term borderline personality disorder was developed to fulfill a diagnostic need and has come to possess specific stereotypes and negative meanings. Because the term borderline is an emotionally charged word, it can lead to a less-than-accurate view of the situation or patient being described, thus presenting a challenge to even the most experienced therapists and becoming one of the most complex disorders to treat. Through the use of one case study, however, experts in borderline personality disorders have put this difficulty at ease. Applying a var.

Electronic resource (access conditions).

English.

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