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Stories of freedom in Black New York / Shane White.

By: White, ShaneMaterial type: TextTextPublication details: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2002. Description: 1 online resource (260 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780674045149; 0674045149; 0674025784; 9780674025783Subject(s): African Company (N.Y.) -- History | African Company (New York, N.Y.) -- History | Metropolitan Museum of Art | African Americans -- New York (State) -- New York -- History -- 19th century | African Americans -- New York (State) -- New York -- Social conditions -- 19th century | African Americans -- New York (State) -- New York -- Intellectual life | African Americans -- Intellectual life -- 19th century | New York (N.Y.) -- History -- 1775-1865 | New York (N.Y.) -- Race relations | New York (N.Y.) -- Intellectual life -- 19th century | African American theater -- New York (State) -- New York -- History -- 19th century | African American actors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Biography | Slavery -- Social aspects -- New York (State) -- New York -- History -- 19th century | HISTORY -- State & Local | HISTORY -- State & Local -- General | HISTORY / United States / Civil War Period (1850-1877) | African American actors | African American theater | African Americans | African Americans -- Intellectual life | African Americans -- Social conditions | Intellectual life | Race relations | Slavery -- Social aspects | New York (State) -- New York | Kulturleben | Gesellschaft | Schwarze | Theater | Vrijgelaten slaven | Openbaar leven | Toneelgezelschappen | Geschichte 1800-1850 | New York (N.Y.) | Schwarze | African Americans History. -- New York (State) -- New York -- History -- 19th century | 1775-1899Genre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books. | Biographies. | History. | Biographies. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Stories of freedom in Black New York.DDC classification: 974.7/100496073 LOC classification: F128.9.N4 | W48 2002ebOther classification: 15.85 | MS 3450 | 15.85. Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Introduction -- The end of slavery -- Staging freedom -- Shakespeare's true representative -- Imitation -- Epilogue.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserveAwards: Co-winner of the James A. Rawley Prize, Organization of American Historians; Winner of the Dixon Ryan Fox Prize, New York State Historical AssociationSummary: White recreates the experience of black New Yorkers as they moved from slavery to freedom. Through research, he imaginatively recovers the raucous world of the street, the elegance of the city's African American balls and the grubbiness of the Police Office. Stories of Freedom in Black New York recreates the experience of black New Yorkers as they moved from slavery to freedom. In the early decades of the nineteenth century, New York City's black community strove to realize what freedom meant, to find a new sense of itself, and, in the process, created a vibrant urban culture. Through exhaustive research, Shane White imaginatively recovers the raucous world of the street, the elegance of the city's African American balls, and the grubbiness of the Police Office. It allows us to observe the style of black men and women, to watch their public behavior, and to hear the cries of black hawkers, the strident music of black parades, and the sly stories of black conmen. Taking center stage in this story is the African Company, a black theater troupe that exemplified the new spirit of experimentation that accompanied slavery's demise. For a few short years in the 1820s, a group of black New Yorkers, many of them ex-slaves, challenged pervasive prejudice and performed plays, including Shakespearean productions, before mixed race audiences. Their audacity provoked feelings of excitement and hope among blacks, but often of disgust by many whites for whom the theater's existence epitomized the horrors of emancipation. Stories of Freedom in Black New York brilliantly intertwines black theater and urban life into a powerful interpretation of what the end of slavery meant for blacks, whites, and New York City itself. White's story of the emergence of free black culture offers a unique understanding of emancipation's impact on everyday life, and on the many forms freedom can take.
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 227-249) and index.

Introduction -- The end of slavery -- Staging freedom -- Shakespeare's true representative -- Imitation -- Epilogue.

Print version record.

Use copy Restrictions unspecified star MiAaHDL

Electronic reproduction. [S.l.] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

digitized 2010 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda MiAaHDL

White recreates the experience of black New Yorkers as they moved from slavery to freedom. Through research, he imaginatively recovers the raucous world of the street, the elegance of the city's African American balls and the grubbiness of the Police Office. Stories of Freedom in Black New York recreates the experience of black New Yorkers as they moved from slavery to freedom. In the early decades of the nineteenth century, New York City's black community strove to realize what freedom meant, to find a new sense of itself, and, in the process, created a vibrant urban culture. Through exhaustive research, Shane White imaginatively recovers the raucous world of the street, the elegance of the city's African American balls, and the grubbiness of the Police Office. It allows us to observe the style of black men and women, to watch their public behavior, and to hear the cries of black hawkers, the strident music of black parades, and the sly stories of black conmen. Taking center stage in this story is the African Company, a black theater troupe that exemplified the new spirit of experimentation that accompanied slavery's demise. For a few short years in the 1820s, a group of black New Yorkers, many of them ex-slaves, challenged pervasive prejudice and performed plays, including Shakespearean productions, before mixed race audiences. Their audacity provoked feelings of excitement and hope among blacks, but often of disgust by many whites for whom the theater's existence epitomized the horrors of emancipation. Stories of Freedom in Black New York brilliantly intertwines black theater and urban life into a powerful interpretation of what the end of slavery meant for blacks, whites, and New York City itself. White's story of the emergence of free black culture offers a unique understanding of emancipation's impact on everyday life, and on the many forms freedom can take.

Co-winner of the James A. Rawley Prize, Organization of American Historians; Winner of the Dixon Ryan Fox Prize, New York State Historical Association

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