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Beautiful mornin' : the Broadway musical in the 1940s / Ethan Mordden.

By: Mordden, Ethan, 1947-Material type: TextTextPublication details: New York : Oxford University Press, 1999. Description: 1 online resource (x, 278 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0195351762; 9780195351767; 9780195128512; 0195128516; 1429400412; 9781429400411; 1280530472; 9781280530470Subject(s): Rodgers, Richard, 1902-1979 | Hammerstein, Oscar, II, 1895-1960 | Rodgers, Richard, 1902-1979 | Hammerstein, Oscar, II, 1895-1960 | Musicals -- New York (State) -- New York -- History and criticism | Popular music -- New York (State) -- New York -- 1941-1950 -- History and criticism | Broadway (New York, N.Y.) -- History | MUSIC -- Genres & Styles -- Musicals | Musicals | Popular music | New York (State) -- New York | New York (State) -- New York -- Broadway | Musicals | Musical | New York <NY> -- Broadway | 1941-1950Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc. | History. | Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Beautiful mornin'.DDC classification: 782.1/4/0973 LOC classification: ML1711.8.N3 | M768 1999ebOther classification: 24.22 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Musical comedy -- Stars -- The road to "Oklahoma!" -- Rodgers and Hammerstein -- Americana -- The dance musical -- Operetta -- Fantasy -- Revue -- The musical comedy II -- The concept musical -- The cast album.
Summary: "Music and girls are the soul of musical comedy," one critic wrote, early in the 1940s. But this was the age that wanted more than melody and a kick line from its musical shows. The form had been running on empty for too long, as a formula for the assembly of spare parts--star comics, generic love songs, rumba dancers, Ethel Merman. If Rodgers and Hammerstein hadn't existed, Broadway would have had to invent them; and Oklahoma! and Carousel came along just in time to announce the New Formula for Writing Musicals: Don't have a formula. Instead, start with strong characters and atmosphere: Oklahoma! with its murderous romantic triangle set against a frontier society that has to learn what democracy is in order to deserve it; or Carousel's dysfunctional family seen in the context of class and gender war. With vitality and occasionally outrageous humor, the author ranges through the decade's classics--Pal Joey, Lady in the Dark, On the Town, Annie Get Your Gun, Phinian's Rainbow, Brigadoon, Kiss Me, Kate, and South Pacific. The 1920s created the musical and the 1930s gave it politics. In the 1940s, it found its soul.
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Includes index.

Musical comedy -- Stars -- The road to "Oklahoma!" -- Rodgers and Hammerstein -- Americana -- The dance musical -- Operetta -- Fantasy -- Revue -- The musical comedy II -- The concept musical -- The cast album.

"Music and girls are the soul of musical comedy," one critic wrote, early in the 1940s. But this was the age that wanted more than melody and a kick line from its musical shows. The form had been running on empty for too long, as a formula for the assembly of spare parts--star comics, generic love songs, rumba dancers, Ethel Merman. If Rodgers and Hammerstein hadn't existed, Broadway would have had to invent them; and Oklahoma! and Carousel came along just in time to announce the New Formula for Writing Musicals: Don't have a formula. Instead, start with strong characters and atmosphere: Oklahoma! with its murderous romantic triangle set against a frontier society that has to learn what democracy is in order to deserve it; or Carousel's dysfunctional family seen in the context of class and gender war. With vitality and occasionally outrageous humor, the author ranges through the decade's classics--Pal Joey, Lady in the Dark, On the Town, Annie Get Your Gun, Phinian's Rainbow, Brigadoon, Kiss Me, Kate, and South Pacific. The 1920s created the musical and the 1930s gave it politics. In the 1940s, it found its soul.

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