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Social mobility in late antique Gaul : strategies and opportunities for the non-elite / Allen E. Jones.

By: Jones, Allen E, 1963-Material type: TextTextPublication details: Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009. Description: 1 online resource (xi, 379 pages) : mapContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0521762391; 9780521762397; 9780511596339; 0511596332; 9780511593383; 0511593384; 9786612303098; 6612303093; 1282303090; 9781282303096; 0511592450; 9780511592454; 1107629926; 9781107629929; 0511596731; 9780511596735Subject(s): Social mobility -- Gaul -- History -- 5th century | Social mobility -- Gaul -- History -- 6th century | Social classes -- Gaul -- History -- 5th century | Social classes -- Gaul -- History -- 6th century | Social structure -- Gaul -- History -- 5th century | Social structure -- Gaul -- History -- 6th century | Gaul -- Social conditions -- 5th century | Gaul -- Social conditions -- 6th century | Gaul -- Religious life and customs -- 5th century | Gaul -- Religious life and customs -- 6th century | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Social Classes | Social classes | Social conditions | Social mobility | Social structure | Europe -- Gaul | 400-599Genre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books. | History. | Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Social mobility in late antique Gaul.DDC classification: 305.5/1309364 LOC classification: HN425 | .J664 2009ebOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Barbarian Gaul -- Evidence and control -- Social structure I : hierarchy, mobility, and aristocracies -- Social structure II : free and servile ranks -- The passive poor : prisoners -- The active poor : pauperes at church -- Healing and authority I : physicians -- Healing and authority II : enchanters.
Summary: In Social Mobility in Late Antique Gaul, Allen Jones explores the situation of the non-elite living in Gaul during the late fifth and sixth centuries. Drawing especially on evidence from Gregory of Tours' writings, he formulates a social model based on people of all ranks who were acting in ways that were socially advantageous to them, such as combining resources, serving at court, and participating in ostentatious religious pursuits, such as building churches. Viewing the society as a whole, and taking into account specific social groups, such as impoverished prisoners, paupers active at churches, physicians, and wonder-working enchanters, Jones creates an image of Barbarian Gaul as an honor-driven, brutal, and flexible society defined by social mobility. His work also addresses topics such as social engineering and competition, magic and religion, and the cult of saints.
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 345-368) and index.

Barbarian Gaul -- Evidence and control -- Social structure I : hierarchy, mobility, and aristocracies -- Social structure II : free and servile ranks -- The passive poor : prisoners -- The active poor : pauperes at church -- Healing and authority I : physicians -- Healing and authority II : enchanters.

Print version record.

In Social Mobility in Late Antique Gaul, Allen Jones explores the situation of the non-elite living in Gaul during the late fifth and sixth centuries. Drawing especially on evidence from Gregory of Tours' writings, he formulates a social model based on people of all ranks who were acting in ways that were socially advantageous to them, such as combining resources, serving at court, and participating in ostentatious religious pursuits, such as building churches. Viewing the society as a whole, and taking into account specific social groups, such as impoverished prisoners, paupers active at churches, physicians, and wonder-working enchanters, Jones creates an image of Barbarian Gaul as an honor-driven, brutal, and flexible society defined by social mobility. His work also addresses topics such as social engineering and competition, magic and religion, and the cult of saints.

English.

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