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To stand and fight : the struggle for civil rights in postwar New York City / Martha Biondi.

By: Biondi, MarthaMaterial type: TextTextPublication details: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2003. Description: 1 online resource (360 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780674020955; 0674020952Subject(s): African Americans -- Civil rights -- New York (State) -- New York -- History -- 20th century | Civil rights movements -- New York (State) -- New York -- History -- 20th century | New York (N.Y.) -- Race relations | New York (N.Y.) -- History -- 1898-1951 | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Political Freedom & Security -- Civil Rights | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Political Freedom & Security -- Human Rights | African Americans -- Civil rights | Civil rights movements | Race relations | New York (State) -- New York | Civil Rights Movement | Direitos humanos (história) -- Século 20 -- New york (ny) | Direito civil (história) -- Século 20 -- New york (ny) | Afro-descendentes (história) -- Século 20 -- New york (ny) | Preconceito racial (história) -- New york (ny) | 1898-1999Genre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books. | History. Additional physical formats: Print version:: To stand and fight.DDC classification: 323/.09747/109045 LOC classification: F128.9.N4 | B56 2003ebOther classification: 15.85 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Prologue: The Rise of the Struggle for Negro Rights -- 1. Jobs for All -- 2. Black Mobilization and Civil Rights Politics -- 3. Lynching, Northern Style -- 4. Desegregating the Metropolis -- 5. Dead Letter Legislation -- 6. An Unnatural Division of People -- 7. Anticommunism and Civil Rights -- 8. The Paradoxical Effects of the Cold War -- 9. Racial Violence in the Free World -- 10. Lift Every Voice and Vote -- 11. Resisting Resegregation -- 12. To Stand and Fight -- Epilogue: Another Kind of America.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserveSummary: Grassroots struggle for racial equality in the urban north of the United States began a decade before the rise of the movement in the South. This work traces the origins of the struggle against white supremacy to the postwar determination of black New Yorkers to win their place in the city.Summary: The story of the civil rights movement typically begins with the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 and culminates with the 1965 voting rights struggle in Selma. But as Martha Biondi shows, a grassroots struggle for racial equality in the urban North began a full ten years before the rise of the movement in the South. This story is an essential first chapter, not only to the southern movement that followed, but to the riots that erupted in northern and western cities just as the civil rights movement was achieving major victories. Biondi tells the story of African Americans who mobilized to make the war against fascism a launching pad for a postwar struggle against white supremacy at home. Rather than seeking integration in the abstract, black New Yorkers demanded first-class citizenship--jobs for all, affordable housing, protection from police violence, access to higher education, and political representation. This powerful local push for economic and political equality met broad resistance, yet managed to win several landmark laws barring discrimination and segregation. To Stand and Fight demonstrates how black New Yorkers launched the modern civil rights struggle and left a rich legacy.
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 293-333) and index.

Prologue: The Rise of the Struggle for Negro Rights -- 1. Jobs for All -- 2. Black Mobilization and Civil Rights Politics -- 3. Lynching, Northern Style -- 4. Desegregating the Metropolis -- 5. Dead Letter Legislation -- 6. An Unnatural Division of People -- 7. Anticommunism and Civil Rights -- 8. The Paradoxical Effects of the Cold War -- 9. Racial Violence in the Free World -- 10. Lift Every Voice and Vote -- 11. Resisting Resegregation -- 12. To Stand and Fight -- Epilogue: Another Kind of America.

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Electronic reproduction. [Place of publication not identified] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

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Print version record.

Grassroots struggle for racial equality in the urban north of the United States began a decade before the rise of the movement in the South. This work traces the origins of the struggle against white supremacy to the postwar determination of black New Yorkers to win their place in the city.

The story of the civil rights movement typically begins with the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 and culminates with the 1965 voting rights struggle in Selma. But as Martha Biondi shows, a grassroots struggle for racial equality in the urban North began a full ten years before the rise of the movement in the South. This story is an essential first chapter, not only to the southern movement that followed, but to the riots that erupted in northern and western cities just as the civil rights movement was achieving major victories. Biondi tells the story of African Americans who mobilized to make the war against fascism a launching pad for a postwar struggle against white supremacy at home. Rather than seeking integration in the abstract, black New Yorkers demanded first-class citizenship--jobs for all, affordable housing, protection from police violence, access to higher education, and political representation. This powerful local push for economic and political equality met broad resistance, yet managed to win several landmark laws barring discrimination and segregation. To Stand and Fight demonstrates how black New Yorkers launched the modern civil rights struggle and left a rich legacy.

English.

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