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5 easy pieces : how fishing impacts marine ecosystems / Daniel Pauly.

By: Pauly, D. (Daniel)Material type: TextTextSeries: State of the world's oceans seriesPublication details: Washington, DC : Island Press, ©2010. Description: 1 online resource (xii, 193 pages) : illustrations, mapsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781597269681; 1597269689Other title: Five easy pieces | 5 easy pieces : the impact of fisheries on marine ecosystems [Cover title]Subject(s): Fisheries -- Environmental aspects | Marine ecology | NATURE -- Animals -- Marine Life | Fisheries -- Environmental aspects | Marine ecologyGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: 5 easy pieces.DDC classification: 577.7/27 LOC classification: QH545.F53 | P38 2010ebOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Primary Production Required. -- A Summer in Manila -- Primary Production Required to Sustain Global Fisheries -- A Response and a Tedious Rejoinder -- The World According to Pimm -- Coverage by the Mass Media -- A Large Fermi Solution -- Fishing Down the Food Web. -- Another Summer in Manila -- Fishing Down Marine Food Webs -- FAO's Comments and Rejoinder -- The CBD and its "Marine Trophic Index" -- The Jellyfish Sandwich -- China and the World's Fisheries. -- Spring in Vancouver Island -- Systematic Distortion in World Fisheries Catch Trends -- The Economist, the FAO, and the World -- Chinese Responses -- The Media, or How Everyone Likes a Different Sauce -- Sustainability. -- What Is Sustainability, Anyway? -- Towards Sustainability in Global Fisheries -- Future of Fisheries. -- Stepping into the Future -- The Future of Fisheries -- The Future Revisited -- Epilogue -- Appendix 1: The Origins of the 100 Million Tonnes Myth -- Appendix 2: Rejoinder : Response to Caddy et al. -- Appendix 3: Post-1998 Studies of "Fishing Down."
Summary: 5 Easy Pieces features five contributions, originally published in Nature and Science, demonstrating the massive impacts of modern industrial fisheries on marine ecosystems. Initially published over an eight-year period, from 1995 to 2003, these articles illustrate a transition in scientific thought-from the initially-contested realization that the crisis of fisheries and their underlying ocean ecosystems was, in fact, global to its broad acceptance by mainstream scientific and public opinion. Daniel Pauly, a well-known fisheries expert who was a co-author of all five articles, presents each original article here and surrounds it with a rich array of contemporary comments, many of which led Pauly and his colleagues to further study. In addition, Pauly documents how popular media reported on the articles and their findings. By doing so, he demonstrates how science evolves. In one chapter, for example, the popular media pick up a contribution and use Pauly's conclusions to contextualize current political disputes; in another, what might be seen as nitpicking by fellow scientists leads Pauly and his colleagues to strengthen their case that commercial fishing is endangering the global marine ecosystem. This structure also allows readers to see how scientists' interactions with the popular media can shape the reception of their own, sometimes controversial, scientific studies. In an epilog, Pauly reflects on the ways that scientific consensus emerges from discussions both within and outside the scientific community.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Primary Production Required. -- A Summer in Manila -- Primary Production Required to Sustain Global Fisheries -- A Response and a Tedious Rejoinder -- The World According to Pimm -- Coverage by the Mass Media -- A Large Fermi Solution -- Fishing Down the Food Web. -- Another Summer in Manila -- Fishing Down Marine Food Webs -- FAO's Comments and Rejoinder -- The CBD and its "Marine Trophic Index" -- The Jellyfish Sandwich -- China and the World's Fisheries. -- Spring in Vancouver Island -- Systematic Distortion in World Fisheries Catch Trends -- The Economist, the FAO, and the World -- Chinese Responses -- The Media, or How Everyone Likes a Different Sauce -- Sustainability. -- What Is Sustainability, Anyway? -- Towards Sustainability in Global Fisheries -- Future of Fisheries. -- Stepping into the Future -- The Future of Fisheries -- The Future Revisited -- Epilogue -- Appendix 1: The Origins of the 100 Million Tonnes Myth -- Appendix 2: Rejoinder : Response to Caddy et al. -- Appendix 3: Post-1998 Studies of "Fishing Down."

Print version record.

5 Easy Pieces features five contributions, originally published in Nature and Science, demonstrating the massive impacts of modern industrial fisheries on marine ecosystems. Initially published over an eight-year period, from 1995 to 2003, these articles illustrate a transition in scientific thought-from the initially-contested realization that the crisis of fisheries and their underlying ocean ecosystems was, in fact, global to its broad acceptance by mainstream scientific and public opinion. Daniel Pauly, a well-known fisheries expert who was a co-author of all five articles, presents each original article here and surrounds it with a rich array of contemporary comments, many of which led Pauly and his colleagues to further study. In addition, Pauly documents how popular media reported on the articles and their findings. By doing so, he demonstrates how science evolves. In one chapter, for example, the popular media pick up a contribution and use Pauly's conclusions to contextualize current political disputes; in another, what might be seen as nitpicking by fellow scientists leads Pauly and his colleagues to strengthen their case that commercial fishing is endangering the global marine ecosystem. This structure also allows readers to see how scientists' interactions with the popular media can shape the reception of their own, sometimes controversial, scientific studies. In an epilog, Pauly reflects on the ways that scientific consensus emerges from discussions both within and outside the scientific community.

English.

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