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Political theory and community building in post-Soviet Russia / edited by Oleg Kharkhordin and Risto Alapuro.

Contributor(s): Kharkhordin, Oleg, 1964- | Alapuro, Risto, 1944-Material type: TextTextSeries: BASEES/Routledge series on Russian and East European studies ; v. 71.Publication details: Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY : Routledge, 2011. Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 237 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780203835241; 0203835247; 9781136855115; 1136855114Subject(s): Community development -- Russia (Federation) -- Cherepovet︠s︡ | Community development -- Political aspects -- Russia (Federation) -- Cherepovet︠s︡ | Infrastructure (Economics) -- Russia (Federation) -- Cherepovet︠s︡ | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Public Policy -- City Planning & Urban Development | Community development | Community development -- Political aspects | Infrastructure (Economics) | Russia (Federation) -- Cherepovet︠s︡Genre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Political theory and community building in post-Soviet Russia.DDC classification: 307.1/4094719 LOC classification: HN530.2.Z9 | C648 2011ebOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
pt. 1. Links with conventional theories -- pt. 2. Case studies.
Summary: "This book revisits many aspects of current social science theories, such as actor-network theory and the French school of science and technology studies, to test how the theories apply in a specific situation: in this case the role of Soviet era infrastructure in the city of Cherepovets in Russia, home of Russia's second biggest steel producer, Severstal. Using political philosophy to analyse the down-to-earth details of the real techno-scientific problems facing the world, the book examines the role of things -- and urban infrastructure in particular -- in political change. It considers how the city's infrastructure, including housing, ICT networks, the provision of public utilities of all kinds, has been transformed in recent years; examines the roles of different actors including the municipal authorities, and explores citizens' differing and sometimes contradictory images of their city. It includes a great deal of new thinking on how communities are built, how common action is initiated to provide public goods, and how the goods themselves -- physical things -- are a crucial driver of community action and community building, arguably more so than more abstract social and human forces"--Provided by publisher.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

pt. 1. Links with conventional theories -- pt. 2. Case studies.

"This book revisits many aspects of current social science theories, such as actor-network theory and the French school of science and technology studies, to test how the theories apply in a specific situation: in this case the role of Soviet era infrastructure in the city of Cherepovets in Russia, home of Russia's second biggest steel producer, Severstal. Using political philosophy to analyse the down-to-earth details of the real techno-scientific problems facing the world, the book examines the role of things -- and urban infrastructure in particular -- in political change. It considers how the city's infrastructure, including housing, ICT networks, the provision of public utilities of all kinds, has been transformed in recent years; examines the roles of different actors including the municipal authorities, and explores citizens' differing and sometimes contradictory images of their city. It includes a great deal of new thinking on how communities are built, how common action is initiated to provide public goods, and how the goods themselves -- physical things -- are a crucial driver of community action and community building, arguably more so than more abstract social and human forces"--Provided by publisher.

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