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The beautiful and damned / F. Scott Fitzgerald ; edited with an introduction and notes by Alan Margolies.

By: Fitzgerald, F. Scott (Francis Scott), 1896-1940Contributor(s): Margolies, AlanMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Oxford world's classics (Oxford University Press)Publication details: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, ©1998. Description: 1 online resource (xxxvi, 359 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780191610516; 0191610518; 9780191611056; 0191611050Subject(s): Inheritance and succession -- Fiction | New York (N.Y.) -- Fiction | Married people -- Fiction | Socialites -- Fiction | Alcoholics -- Fiction | Young men -- Fiction | United States -- Social conditions -- 1918-1932 -- Fiction | FICTION -- General | Alcoholics | Inheritance and succession | Married people | Social conditions | Socialites | Young men | New York (State) -- New York | United States | 1918-1932Genre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books. | Domestic fiction. | Fiction. | Psychological fiction. | Psychological fiction. | Domestic fiction. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Beautiful and damned.DDC classification: 813/.52 LOC classification: PS3511.I9 | B4 1998ebOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Introduction; Note on the Text; Select Bibliography; A Chronology of F. Scott Fitzgerald; THE BEAUTIFUL AND DAMNED; Explanatory Notes.
Summary: T̀he victor belongs to the spoils.' Fitzgerald's ironic epigraph to The Beautiful and Damned exemplifies his attitude toward the young rootless post-World War One generation who believed life to be meaningless and who pursued wealth despite its corrosive effect. Gloria and Anthony Patch party until money runs out; then their goal becomes Adam Patch's fortune. Gloria's beauty fades and Anthony's drinking takes its horrible toll. Fitzgerald here once again displays a wariness of the upper classes, àn abiding distrust, an animosity, toward the leisure class - not the conviction of a revolutionist.
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Includes bibliographical references (pages xxviii-xxxi) and index.

Print version record.

Cover; Contents; Introduction; Note on the Text; Select Bibliography; A Chronology of F. Scott Fitzgerald; THE BEAUTIFUL AND DAMNED; Explanatory Notes.

T̀he victor belongs to the spoils.' Fitzgerald's ironic epigraph to The Beautiful and Damned exemplifies his attitude toward the young rootless post-World War One generation who believed life to be meaningless and who pursued wealth despite its corrosive effect. Gloria and Anthony Patch party until money runs out; then their goal becomes Adam Patch's fortune. Gloria's beauty fades and Anthony's drinking takes its horrible toll. Fitzgerald here once again displays a wariness of the upper classes, àn abiding distrust, an animosity, toward the leisure class - not the conviction of a revolutionist.

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