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Power, protest, and the public schools : Jewish and African American struggles in New York City / Melissa F. Weiner.

By: Weiner, Melissa FMaterial type: TextTextPublication details: New Brunswick, NJ : Rutgers University Press, 2010. Description: 1 online resource (xi, 249 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813549804; 0813549809; 9786613383143; 6613383147Subject(s): African Americans -- Education -- New York (State) -- New York | African Americans -- New York (State) -- New York -- Social conditions | Jews -- Education -- New York (State) -- New York | Jews -- New York (State) -- New York -- Social conditions | Public schools -- New York (State) -- New York | Discrimination in education -- New York (State) -- New York | Racism in education -- New York (State) -- New York | New York (N.Y.) -- Race relations | New York (N.Y.) -- Social conditions | EDUCATION -- Students & Student Life | HISTORY -- United States -- State & Local -- Middle Atlantic (DC, DE, MD, NJ, NY, PA) | African Americans -- Education | African Americans -- Social conditions | Discrimination in education | Jews -- Education | Jews -- Social conditions | Public schools | Race relations | Racism in education | Social conditions | New York (State) -- New YorkGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Power, Protest, and the Public Schools : Jewish and African American Struggles in New York City.DDC classification: 371.8299607307471 LOC classification: LC2803.N5 | W45 2010Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
New York City's racial and educational terrain -- Resources, riots, and race: the Gary plan and the Harlem 9 -- Resource equalization and citizenship rights -- Contesting curriculum: Hebrew and African American history -- Multicultural curriculum, representation, and group identities -- Racism, resistance, and racial formation in the public schools -- The foreseeable split: Ocean Hill-Brownsville and Jewish and African American relations today.
Summary: Accounts of Jewish immigrants usually describe the role of education in helping youngsters earn a higher social position than their parents. Power, Protest, and the Public Schools argues that New York City schools did not serve as pathways to mobility for Jewish or African American students. Instead, at different points in the city's history, politicians and administrators erected similar racial barriers to social advancement by marginalizing and denying resources that other students enjoyed. It concludes by considering how today's Hispanic and Arab children face similar inequalities w.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Accounts of Jewish immigrants usually describe the role of education in helping youngsters earn a higher social position than their parents. Power, Protest, and the Public Schools argues that New York City schools did not serve as pathways to mobility for Jewish or African American students. Instead, at different points in the city's history, politicians and administrators erected similar racial barriers to social advancement by marginalizing and denying resources that other students enjoyed. It concludes by considering how today's Hispanic and Arab children face similar inequalities w.

Print version record.

New York City's racial and educational terrain -- Resources, riots, and race: the Gary plan and the Harlem 9 -- Resource equalization and citizenship rights -- Contesting curriculum: Hebrew and African American history -- Multicultural curriculum, representation, and group identities -- Racism, resistance, and racial formation in the public schools -- The foreseeable split: Ocean Hill-Brownsville and Jewish and African American relations today.

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