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Developing a 21st century neuroscience workforce : workshop summary / Sheena M. Posey Norris, Christopher Palmer, Clare Stroud, and Bruce M. Altevogt, rapporteurs ; Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders, Board on Health Sciences Policy, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies.

By: Norris, Sheena M. Posey [rapporteur.]Contributor(s): Palmer, Chris (Christopher R.) [rapporteur.] | Stroud, Clare [rapporteur.] | Altevogt, Bruce M [rapporteur.] | Institute of Medicine (U.S.). Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders [issuing body.] | Defining the Expertise Needed for the 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce (Workshop) (2014 : Washington, D.C.)Material type: TextTextPublisher: Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, [2015]Description: 1 online resource (1 PDF file (xi, 116 pages)) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 030936874X; 9780309368742; 9780309368759; 0309368758Subject(s): Neurosciences -- United States -- Congresses | Neurosciences -- Technological innovations -- Congresses | Neurosciences | United States | HEALTH & FITNESS -- Diseases -- General | MEDICAL -- Clinical Medicine | MEDICAL -- Diseases | MEDICAL -- Evidence-Based Medicine | MEDICAL -- Internal Medicine | Neurosciences | United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Congress. | Electronic books. | Conference papers and proceedings. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Developing a 21st century neuroscience workforce.DDC classification: 616.89 LOC classification: RC327 | .D44 2014ebNLM classification: 2016 A-646 | WL 100Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Introduction and overview -- Training neuroscientists in basic research, tool, and technology development, and big data -- Improving training in protocol design, experimental rigor, and quantitative skills -- Training in transdisciplinary research -- Enhancing training to support translational research.
Abstract: From its very beginning, neuroscience has been fundamentally interdisciplinary. As a result of rapid technological advances and the advent of large collaborative projects, however, neuroscience is expanding well beyond traditional subdisciplines and intellectual boundaries to rely on expertise from many other fields, such as engineering, computer science, and applied mathematics. This raises important questions about to how to develop and train the next generation of neuroscientists to ensure innovation in research and technology in the neurosciences. In addition, the advent of new types of data and the growing importance of large datasets raise additional questions about how to train students in approaches to data analysis and sharing. These concerns dovetail with the need to teach improved scientific practices ranging from experimental design (e.g., powering of studies and appropriate blinding) to improved sophistication in statistics. Of equal importance is the increasing need not only for basic researchers and teams that will develop the next generation of tools, but also for investigators who are able to bridge the translational gap between basic and clinical neuroscience. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce is the summary of a workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine's Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders on October 28 and 29,2014, in Washington, DC, to explore future workforce needs and how these needs should inform training programs. Workshop participants considered what new subdisciplines and collaborations might be needed, including an examination of opportunities for cross-training of neuroscience research programs with other areas. In addition, current and new components of training programs were discussed to identify methods for enhancing data handling and analysis capabilities, increasing scientific accuracy, and improving research practices. This report highlights the presentation and discussion of the workshop.
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From its very beginning, neuroscience has been fundamentally interdisciplinary. As a result of rapid technological advances and the advent of large collaborative projects, however, neuroscience is expanding well beyond traditional subdisciplines and intellectual boundaries to rely on expertise from many other fields, such as engineering, computer science, and applied mathematics. This raises important questions about to how to develop and train the next generation of neuroscientists to ensure innovation in research and technology in the neurosciences. In addition, the advent of new types of data and the growing importance of large datasets raise additional questions about how to train students in approaches to data analysis and sharing. These concerns dovetail with the need to teach improved scientific practices ranging from experimental design (e.g., powering of studies and appropriate blinding) to improved sophistication in statistics. Of equal importance is the increasing need not only for basic researchers and teams that will develop the next generation of tools, but also for investigators who are able to bridge the translational gap between basic and clinical neuroscience. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce is the summary of a workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine's Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders on October 28 and 29,2014, in Washington, DC, to explore future workforce needs and how these needs should inform training programs. Workshop participants considered what new subdisciplines and collaborations might be needed, including an examination of opportunities for cross-training of neuroscience research programs with other areas. In addition, current and new components of training programs were discussed to identify methods for enhancing data handling and analysis capabilities, increasing scientific accuracy, and improving research practices. This report highlights the presentation and discussion of the workshop.

This project was supported by contracts between the National Academy of Sciences and the Alzheimer's Association; Brain Canada Foundation; the Department of Health and Human Services' Food and Drug Administration and National Institutes of Health (NIH, Contract No. HHSN26300026 [Under Master Base #DHHS-10001292]) through the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, National Eye Institute, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institute on Aging, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institute on Drug Abuse, and NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research; Department of Veterans Affairs (VA240-14-C-0057); Eli Lilly and Company; Foundation for the National Institutes of Health; the Gatsby Charitable Foundation; GlaxoSmithKline, Inc.; Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, LLC; Lundbeck Research USA; Merck Research Laboratories; The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research; the National Multiple Sclerosis Society; the National Science Foundation (BCS-1064270); One Mind for Research; Orion Bionetworks; Pfizer Inc.; Pharmaceutical Product Development, LLC; Sanofi; the Society for Neuroscience; Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited; and Wellcome Trust. The views presented in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of the organizations or agencies that provided support for this project.

Version viewed November 13, 2015.

Introduction and overview -- Training neuroscientists in basic research, tool, and technology development, and big data -- Improving training in protocol design, experimental rigor, and quantitative skills -- Training in transdisciplinary research -- Enhancing training to support translational research.

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